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Tunisia

What's the child marriage rate? How big of an issue is child marriage?

2% of girls in Tunisia are married before the age of 18.

Child marriage is slightly more prevalent in rural parts of the country.

Are there country-specific drivers of child marriage in this country?

Child marriage is driven by gender inequality and the belief that women and girls are somehow inferior to men and boys.

There is limited information on child marriage in Tunisia.

What has this country committed to?

Tunisia has committed to eliminate child, early and forced marriage by 2030 in line with target 5.3 of the Sustainable Development Goals.

Tunisia co-sponsored the 2017 Human Rights Council resolution recognising the need to address child, early and forced marriage in humanitarian contexts.

Tunisia co-sponsored the 2013 and 2014 UN General Assembly resolutions on child, early and forced marriage, and the 2013 Human Rights Council resolution on child, early and forced marriage. In 2014, Tunisia signed a joint statement at the Human Rights Council calling for a resolution on child marriage.

Tunisia ratified the Convention on the Rights of the Child in 1992, which sets a minimum age of marriage of 18, and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) in 1985, which obligates states to ensure free and full consent to marriage.

In 1995 Tunisia signed, but has not yet ratified, the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child, including Article 21 regarding the prohibition of child marriage.

Tunisia has not signed or ratified the African Charter on Human and People’s Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa, including Article 6 which sets the minimum age for marriage as 18.

What is the minimum legal framework around marriage?

In May 2007 the government amended the Personal Status Code (Act No. 2007-32) to raise the minimum age of marriage for girls and boys to 18 years. Girls below this age can only get married with the consent of both their guardian and their mother, and with special authorisation from a judge in “extremely serious” cases. the
Middle East and North Africa

Source

African Commission on Human and People’s Rights, African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child, [website], 2018, http://www.achpr.org/instruments/child/ratification (accessed February 2018)

African Commission on Human and People’s Rights, Protocol to the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa, [website], 2018, http://www.achpr.org/instruments/women-protocol/ (accessed February 2018)

Ministère du Développement et de la Coopération Internationale, MDCI – Institut National de la Statistique et Fonds des Nations Unies pour l’Enfance, Suivi de la situation des enfants et des femmes en Tunisie- Enquête par grappes à indicateurs multiples 2011-2012, 2013, https://mics-surveys-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/MICS4/Middle%20East%20and%20North%20Africa/Tunisia/2011-2012/Final/Tunisia%202011-12%20MICS_French.pdf (accessed May 2018)

Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark, Joint statement on child, early and forced marriage, HRC 27, Agenda Item 3, [website], 2014,
http://fngeneve.um.dk/en/aboutus/statements/newsdisplaypage/?newsid=6371ad93-8fb0-4c35-b186-820fa996d379 (accessed April 2018)

UNICEF, Tunisia: MENA Gender Equality Profile, Status of Girls and Women in the Middle East and North Africa, 2011, https://www.unicef.org/gender/files/Tunisia-Gender-Eqaulity-Profile-2011.pdf (accessed May 2018)and

UN Child Rights Committee, Consideration of reports submitted by States parties under Article 44 of the Convention, 2010, http://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/treatybodyexternal/Download.aspx?symbolno=CRC/C/TUN/CO/3&Lang=En (accessed May 2018)

United Nations, Sustainable Development Knowledge Platform, [website], 2017, https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/sdg5 (accessed February 2018)

* Child marriage prevalence is the percentage of women 20-24 years old who were married or in union before they were 18 years old (UNICEF State of the World’s Children, 2017)