Child marriage around the world:

Togo

Child marriage rates
UNICEF 2016 % Married by 15
6%
UNICEF 2016 % Married by 18
22%

* References

* Child marriage prevalence is the percentage of women 20-24 years old who were married or in union before they were 18 years old.

* According to UNICEF’s State of the World’s Children 2016.

Photo credit: Stephan Gladieu | World Bank

Child marriage rates
UNICEF 2016 % Married by 15
6%
UNICEF 2016 % Married by 18
22%

* References

* Child marriage prevalence is the percentage of women 20-24 years old who were married or in union before they were 18 years old.

* According to UNICEF’s State of the World’s Children 2016.

Togo has a child marriage prevalence rate of 22%. On average, one out of four girls will be married before their 18th birthday.

Drivers

Child marriage in Togo occurs more frequently among girls who are the least educated, poorest and living in rural areas.

Education also is associated with the prevalence of child marriage in Togo. 44% of women aged 20-24 with no education and 29% with primary education were married or in union at age 18, compared to only 8% of women with secondary education or higher.

Legal age of marriage

The minimum age of marriage is 18 for girls and 20 for boys but both can marry under 18 or 20 with parental consent.

National programme to end child marriage

The Togolese ministries of Education, Gender and Health have taken the lead in developing a National Programme Against Child Marriage and Teenage Pregnancy.

The programme is part of two main development plans: an economic development plan and the “Vision 2030” plan: the “Vision 2030” is a national development programme towards the year 2030 which has been launched in April 2014.

The programme focuses on the prevention of teenage pregnancy and child marriage as well as providing social protection to girls who were married as children.

It is a multisectoral approach centred around 5 points:

  • Improving the legal framework;
  • Access and keeping adolescent girls in the education system and access to comprehensive sex education;
  • Access to adolescent-friendly information and sexual and reproductive health services;
  • Encouraging adolescent girls’ leadership and strengthening the capacity of families, communities, traditional and religious leaders;
  • Coordination, advocacy, resource mobilisation and monitoring and evaluation.

The programme has been adopted in December 2014 but has yet to be confirmed during the Council of Ministers; then the implementation phase would start.

Sources