Child marriage around the world:

Eritrea

Child marriage rates
UNICEF 2016 % Married by 15
13%
UNICEF 2016 % Married by 18
41%
International Ranking*

14

* References

* Child marriage prevalence is the percentage of women 20-24 years old who were married or in union before they were 18 years old.

* According to UNICEF’s State of the World’s Children 2016.

A nikah khawan shares his experience with preventing child marriages during a workshop organised by Girls Not Brides member Sujag Sansar Organization in Pakistan. Photo credit: Sujag Sansar Organization.

Child marriage rates
UNICEF 2016 % Married by 15
13%
UNICEF 2016 % Married by 18
41%
International Ranking*

14

* References

* Child marriage prevalence is the percentage of women 20-24 years old who were married or in union before they were 18 years old.

* According to UNICEF’s State of the World’s Children 2016.

Nearly 1 in 2 girls in Eritrea are married by their 18th birthday.

The Constitution of Eritrea guarantees equal rights for women yet the incidence of child marriage remains high due to deep rooted cultural beliefs and practices.

Drivers

Child marriage in Eritrea is driven by poverty, dowry and patriarchal ideals of purity.

Limited access to education is associated with the high prevalence of child marriage in Eritrea. 64% of women aged 20-24 with no education and 53% with primary education were married by 18 years, compared to just 12% of women with secondary education or higher.

Legal age of marriage

The Eritrean Civil Code (articles 329 and 581) sets the minimum age of marriage at 18 years for both girls and boys.

However, there is a lack of awareness about the legality of child marriage and its harmful impacts. A major difficulty in tackling child marriage is the conflicting nature of Eritrea’s legal systems, as formal and customary laws are not harmonised.

Customary law carries great weight in Eritrean society and provides for a minimum age of marriage which is 15 for females and 18 for males.

Government response

On 11 June 2016, the Government of Eritrea launched the African Union campaign to end child marriage and a multi-sectoral national strategy to end child marriage.

The government is working on tackling female genital cutting and gender parity in elementary and middle education, which aims to improve the status of girls in Eritrean society and decrease the incidence of child marriage. The Ministry of Education is conducting awareness-raising on the need to send girls to school, while supporting married girls to complete their education.

In the early 1990s, the Eritrean People’s Liberation Front sought social transformation around women’s issues and successfully pushed for legislation that abolished forced marriages, child marriages and dowries.

Sources
  • Eritrean Population Health Survey, 2010
  • Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Teenage Childbearing and Child Health in Eritrea, 2005
  • Melchiorre, “At What Age…Are school-children employed, married, and taken to court?” The Right to Education Project, 2004
  • Youth Policy, Fact Sheet: Eritrea, 2015
  • UN Committee, Concluding Observations to Eritrea’s State Party Report, 2008